3 min read

Does Insurance Cover Egg Freezing?

If you think you might want to delay pregnancy and may decide to have babies in your 40s or later, egg freezing can be a great option. But, the high cost of the procedure can make you think twice. So, Does Insurance Cover Egg Freezing?

 

Though health insurance policies cover most of the infertility diagnosis and treatment costs, procedures like egg freezing are rarely covered. This is because egg-freezing is considered elective by insurance companies.

 

Let’s take a look at the cost of egg freezing and help you decide if it is worth it.

 

Cost of Egg Freezing

 

A single egg-freezing cycle costs between $6,000 and $10,000. This cycle takes about six weeks and includes initial tests, injections, and retrieval surgery, excluding the annual storage fee for frozen eggs. Egg storage fees start at $600 annually.

 

The total cost of egg-freezing can be broken down as follows:

●     Treatment: $11,000

●     Medication: $5,000

●     Storage: $2,000 (For four years)

The costs vary depending on your location. For instance, the cost of one cycle of egg-freezing ranges from $13,800 in Boston to $17,800 in New York City. And, since most women undergo the cycle twice, the total cost can reach up to $40,000.

Egg Freezing and Insurance

Although egg freezing is usually not covered by your health insurance, some plans cover it when done with medical reasons. In May 2018, the federal Access to Infertility Treatment and Care Act introduced a bill to mandate insurance coverage for fertility preservation. The bill aims to support patients who undergo fertility preservation procedures, such as egg freezing, due to medically necessary procedures such as cancer treatments.

In addition, some parts of the process, such as a physician consultation, ultrasounds, bloodwork, and ovarian reserve testing, may be covered by several insurance companies.

Only 16 states in the USA require insurance companies to offer coverage for infertility diagnosis and treatment. You’d be surprised to know that top companies, including Google, Facebook, and Apple offer egg freezing as a company benefit to their employees.

You are advised to review your insurance plan or contact your insurance company to explain the coverage to you.

Is Egg Freezing Worth the Cost?

A study conducted by Yale Medicine revealed that there is only a 3-5% chance to have a baby with egg freezing. However, doctors often collect multiple eggs, thus increasing the chance of late pregnancy.

Women considering egg freezing should not rush with their decision. Choose this procedure without any pressure and after a long discussion with your doctor.

In addition, you should carefully consider your reproductive goals, health, and overall costs involved. Success also depends on the age of the woman and overall health. The older you are, the lower are your chances of getting pregnant with a frozen egg.

Alternatives to Pay for Egg Freezing

Does your insurance cover egg freezing? If not, don’t lose hope! You can consider other funding options.

Talk to your financial advisor to find some alternatives. Many fertility clinics also offer payment options for egg freezing. You can even opt for crowdsourcing and borrow from someone close to you.

Summing up all points, it is safe to say that egg freezing is worth considering if your health goals and budget allow.

 

Get the Expert Written Book "Female Explained" by FemHealth®
FacebookInstagram
Disclaimer & Terms of Use
© 2019 FemHealth® Project. All Rights Reserved.