Does Insurance Cover Egg Freezing?

If you think you might want to delay pregnancy and may decide to have babies in your 40s or later, egg freezing can be a great option. But, the high cost of the procedure can make you think twice. So, Does Insurance Cover Egg Freezing? Though health insurance policies cover most of the infertility diagnosis and treatment costs, procedures like egg freezing are rarely covered. This is because egg-freezing is considered elective by insurance companies.  Let’s take a look at the cost of egg freezing and help you decide if it is worth it.   A single egg-freezing cycle costs between $6,000 and $10,000. This cycle takes about six weeks and includes initial tests, injections, and retrieval surgery, excluding the annual storage fee for frozen eggs. Egg storage fees start at $600 annually.  The total cost of egg-freezing can be broken down as follows:●     Treatment: $11,000●     Medication: $5,000●     Storage: $2,000 (For four years)The costs vary depending on your location. For instance, the cost of one cycle of egg-freezing ranges from $13,800 in Boston to $17,800 in New York City. And, since most women undergo the cycle twice, the total cost can reach up to $40,000. Although egg freezing is usually not covered by your health insurance, some plans cover it when done with medical reasons. In May 2018, the federal Access to Infertility Treatment and Care Act introduced a bill to mandate insurance coverage for fertility preservation. The bill aims to support patients who undergo fertility preservation procedures, such as egg freezing, due to medically necessary procedures such as cancer treatments. In addition, some parts of the process, such as a physician consultation, ultrasounds, bloodwork, and ovarian reserve testing, may be covered by several insurance companies. Only 16 states in the USA require insurance companies to offer coverage for infertility diagnosis and treatment. You’d be surprised to know that top companies, including Google, Facebook, and Apple offer egg freezing as a company benefit to their employees. You are advised to review your insurance plan or contact your insurance company to explain the coverage to you. A study conducted by Yale Medicine revealed that there is only a 3-5% chance to have a baby with egg freezing. However, doctors often collect multiple eggs, thus increasing the chance of late pregnancy. Women considering egg freezing should not rush with their decision. Choose this procedure without any pressure and after a long discussion with your doctor. In addition, you should carefully consider your reproductive goals, health, and overall costs involved. Success also depends on the age of the woman and overall health. The older you are, the lower are your chances of getting pregnant with a frozen egg. Does your insurance cover egg freezing? If not, don’t lose hope! You can consider other funding options. Talk to your financial advisor to find some alternatives. Many fertility clinics also offer payment options for egg freezing. You can even opt for crowdsourcing and borrow from someone close to you. Summing up all points, it is safe to say that egg freezing is worth considering if your health goals and budget allow.  
3 min read

What is Egg Freezing?

Freezing eggs is a decision that some women may want to explore based on their lifestyle or health. There are many questions that surround the process of egg freezing and it can leave many feeling overwhelmed. Today we answer the most common questions asked and we also go into detail on how the procedure is completed. If you or someone you know is interested in freezing eggs for future use, then read ahead. Freezing your eggs can be done for a number of reasons ranging from wanting to get pregnant later in life to having certain medical conditions. Egg freezing doesn’t require sperm, unlike embryo cryopreservation. However, it will require you to take fertility drugs to start the ovulation process so that your body will produce multiple eggs. Those that might want to consider egg freezing are:Egg freezing is not something you want to take lightly. The first step you want to do is find a fertility clinic that has experts in this matter. These experts are commonly referred to as a reproductive endocrinologist. Each clinic you look into should list their data of live births, pregnancies, and some will even include the ages of the women they treat. This information can be found on a clinic’s website, an in-person consultation, and the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology has more information on the data surrounding US fertility clinics. Before you begin the freezing process, you will have to undergo various testing. These tests include:There are 3 steps to completing the egg freezing process. The first is ovarian stimulation, the second is the egg retrieval, and the third is freezing.Egg freezing doesn’t happen without any risks. There can be complications due to the procedure or fertility drugs. Some of these risks include:This will depend on your insurance company. Some will pay for medication but not the procedure or the testing. Others will pay for testing only. Overall, egg freezing isn’t covered by most insurances, but some will cover partial or full coverage if you suffer from a special circumstance such as cancer or early menopause. Those that don’t have insurance that covers this procedure or any insurance at all may find a fertility clinic that can help finance you, you can fundraise money, look into getting personal loans, or even some government and state grants can be applied for. The cost of egg freezing varies depending on a few factors. One factor is the clinic you choose. Each one charges their own prices for the services they offer, usually between $7,000 and $12,000 and that cost includes the medication, procedure, and testing. The storage fees will vary based on the clinic as well, but many charges somewhere between $500 to $1,000 a year. There is also no time limit on when you have to unfreeze your eggs, but keep in mind that if you intend to get pregnant, many clinics have cut off ages unless you plan to use a surrogate. It’s best to check with the clinic on their policies first.Another factor is how many rounds you may need to undergo. As you age, your body will naturally make fewer eggs so while someone in their early 20s or 30s may need 1 cycle, mid-30s and late 30s may need 2 or 3 cycles to get the necessary amount of eggs needed for freezing. This also can be affected by your egg quality as well. If you have poorer egg quality, you may need to do several cycles. Unfreezing your eggs when you feel it’s time to try for pregnancy can cost around $5,000 to $7,000.
7 min read

How to know if you have PCOS or Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome?

PCOS is also known as Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. It is a hormonal imbalance that occurs in some women and adolescent girls. The condition is so common, up to 10% of all women may have PCOS. (Dumesic, Daniel A et al. )That means that one in every 10 girls or women have PCOS. So for example, if there is a room of 100 girls, 10 of them will have PCOS. Girls with PCOS have problems with their period. Some girls have no periods, whereas others can have very frequent periods. If your period happens more often than every 21 days or less often than every 45 days you should see your doctor as this can be a sign of PCOS. Some girls can go a year or more with no periods. It is important to understand, however, that menstrual periods can be irregular for up to two to three years after a girl starts having her period. Most physicians will wait to diagnose PCOS until a girl hs had her period for at least 2 years before saying it is irregular. (Legro, Richard S et al. Girls with PCOS can also have increased hair on their bodies in places that girls and women do not like to have hair such as their face, stomach, chest and lower back. Some girls with PCOS can also have severe acne. Girls with PCOS can also have a harder time losing weight or can gain weight more easily. Girls and women with PCOS also can have a higher risk of developing high blood sugars or a condition like Type 2 diabetes. Some girls with PCOS can also have feelings of sadness, anxiety or depression. If you are diagnosed with PCOS, this does not mean that you have “cysts” on your ovaries. Girls with PCOS usually have normal looking ovaries but they may look slightly bigger than normal. The enlarged ovaries usually do not cause any pain.Doctors don’t know the exact cause of PCOS but it is thought to be genetic, meaning that someone in the girl’s family most likely has PCOS as well but this is not always the case. In PCOS, there are specific hormones called androgen hormones that are higher than normal. One of these androgens is called testosterone and it is higher than normal. This imbalance in androgen hormones can cause the periods to be irregular because these hormones can prevent an egg from being released from the ovary every month. The higher testosterone level can also cause girls to have an increase in facial and body hair and can cause acne.
Usually your doctor will talk to you first about your symptoms and family history. Then they will want to do a physical exam. They will usually want to order some blood tests to help figure out if you have PCOS. Sometimes, an ultrasound of the ovaries is done to help understand if you truly have PCOS.The treatment of PCOS is geared towards what specific symptoms you have and what is bothering you the most. If you have irregular periods, usually the first line treatment is birth control pills. Many of the symptoms of PCOS like irregular periods, acne and frequency of growth of hair on the face and body can be controlled with birth control pills. You may also need to be treated by a dermatologist or laser specialist for acne and hair growth.For girls that are overweight, doctors will recommend weight loss with diet changes and exercise to prevent further weight gain or to start a weight loss program.Exercise and weight loss sometimes can help periods become more regular and they can help prevent diabetes. Exercise is also help with mood symptoms including anxiety and depression. Another commonly prescribed medication is metformin which is a medicine used to treat diabetes. Sometimes at higher doses of this medication, menstrual periods can return to normal.( Legro, Richard S, et al).Once girls are treated for PCOS, they generally are very well controlled. Girls and women with PCOS may be an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. They may have a hard time getting pregnant in the future but this is not always the case. Girls and women should still use birth control pills to help prevent unwanted pregnancies if they are sexually active.Your doctor is always a good resource if you have other questions.Dumesic, Daniel A et al. “Scientific Statement on the Diagnostic Criteria, Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Molecular Genetics of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.” Endocrine reviews vol. 36,5 (2015): 487-525. doi:10.1210/er.2015-1018Legro, Richard S et al. “Diagnosis and treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome: an Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline.” The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism vol. 98,12 (2013): 4565-92. doi:10.1210/jc.2013-2350Witchel SF, Oberfield SE, Peña AS. “Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Pathophysiology, Presentation, and Treatment With Emphasis on Adolescent Girls. J Endocr Soc. 2019 Aug 1;3(8):1545-1573. doi: 10.1210/js.2019-00078. eCollection 2019 Aug 1. Review. PubMed PMID: 31384717; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6676075.Carmina E, Oberfield SE, Lobo RA. The diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome in adolescents. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Sep;203(3):201.e1-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2010.03.008. Epub 2010 May 1. Review. PubMed PMID: 20435290.
5 min read
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